Queer Voices: Technologies, Vocalities, and the Musical Flaw by F. Jarman-Ivens

By F. Jarman-Ivens

This publication argues that there are a few very important implications of the position the voice performs in well known track whilst considering techniques of id. The significant thesis is that the voice in well known tune is in all likelihood uncanny (Freud's unheimlich), and that this can invite or safeguard opposed to id via the listener.

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Extra resources for Queer Voices: Technologies, Vocalities, and the Musical Flaw

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He describes how Hélène Cixous’s reading of “The Uncanny” illustrates Freud’s own latent anxieties about sexual difference, suggesting that the uncanny as a category is always laden with those fears. In particular, what is worth drawing attention to, as Cixous does, is how Freud’s essay connects the uncanny to fears of castration, as he does for instance in connecting “the uncanny effect of the SandMan [from Hoffmann’s tales, one of Freud’s central examples] to the anxiety belonging to the castration complex of childhood” (1955, 233).

This acts in combination with a different musical environment—the track ends, and the note with it, in a grand finale—and a much less radical shift in vocal timbre. ” When listening to this final climax in “Un año de amor,” I am aware in part of wanting to produce Casal’s sound, and simultaneously of a desperate and uncomfortable desire for the “right” note (that which is finally reached as her vibrato kicks in) to be reached. That desire is also present when listening to Redding—I have suggested that already—but my feeling in response to Redding is of being willing to go along with the note, into the note almost, whereas with Casal part of me pushes against the sound; perhaps here, I want to make the sound partly in order to rectify its pitch.

We should not, though, regard queer as simply a subset of the uncanny, for, as Nicholas Royle argues, “The uncanny is queer. And the queer is uncanny” (2002, 43). He describes how Hélène Cixous’s reading of “The Uncanny” illustrates Freud’s own latent anxieties about sexual difference, suggesting that the uncanny as a category is always laden with those fears. In particular, what is worth drawing attention to, as Cixous does, is how Freud’s essay connects the uncanny to fears of castration, as he does for instance in connecting “the uncanny effect of the SandMan [from Hoffmann’s tales, one of Freud’s central examples] to the anxiety belonging to the castration complex of childhood” (1955, 233).

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